blkdzn:

Can y’all actually believe a man shot and killed someone and he isn’t in jail yet after nearly a month? Like really let that sink in. A man killed an 18 year old child and he is on paid leave from his job. Really think about that.

Source: blkdzn via

socialjusticekoolaid:

"All I did — what I did was — was release the videotape to you, because I had to," Jackson told reporters on Aug. 15 when asked why he released the robbery footage. "I’d been sitting on it, but I — too many people put in a [Freedom of Information Act] request for that thing, and I had to release that tape to you."

Writing for The Blot, Matthew Keys reports that the police department did not receive any specific requests for the videotape.

"A review of open records requests sent to the Ferguson Police Department found that no news organization, reporter or individual specifically sought the release of the surveillance tape before police distributed it on Aug. 15," Keys writes.

Journalist Andrew Perez also said that he has tried to get the documents to show who sent FOIA requests for the recording.

"I requested all requests for the videotape too, and they produced a ton of docs but no requests for the tape," Perez tweeted.

Perez also tweeted that, when asked, Ferguson Police spokesperson Tim Zoll couldn’t think of any specific requests for the tape.

Your daily reminder the Ferguson Police Department participated in a large-scale conspiracy to slander and demonize Michael Brown, while protecting his murderer, fellow officer Darren Wilson. How and why anyone could still be defending these armed thugsis beyond me. #staywoke #farfromover 

Source: socialjusticekoolaid via

heyveronica:

"Columbia Univeristy senior Emma Sulkowicz plans on carrying an extra-long, twin-size to every class, every day until the man she says raped her moves off campus. Sulkowicz is one of three women who made complaints to Columbia against the same fellow senior, who was found "not responsible" in all three cases."

Beyond ‘No Means No’  by Jessica Valenti for The Guardian

Source: theguardian.com via
De-Extinction and the Passenger Pigeon

annmarcaida:

image

The last lonely passenger pigeon died in 1914. Her stuffed body is on display at the Smithsonian Institution.  I’ve seen her.  It’s a sad exhibit.

But what if passenger pigeons could be reincarnated?

That’s the idea behind de-extinction. Take DNA harvested from museum specimens and figure out which genes are most important to the species’ identity.  Then use genetic engineering to edit in the DNA of a closely related species (in this case the band-tailed pigeon).  If all goes well, a chimera pigeon (with both passenger and band-tailed genes)  that looks and acts like a passenger pigeon could be hatched by a band-tailed mother.  

When and if chimera passenger pigeons are produced, there will initially be very few.  In a very small population, closely-related individuals must mate.  This inbreeding can be lethal in the short term but might be good for the population in the long term.

To predict the effects of inbreeding on the chimera passenger pigeons, it’s important to know whether the species in question went through at least one “population bottleneck" as humans probably did 70,000 years ago.  Historical records suggest that the original passenger pigeon population did this several times, as their populations were subjected to “boom and bust” cycles.

That’s a good news, because inbreeding can purge lethal genes from a species’ gene pool.  This happens when individuals carrying especially bad gene combinations die before they can reproduce, thus lowering the incidence of deleterious genes.  

After a bottleneck purges lethal genes, it’s possible for the a tiny population to develop a healthy gene pool.  Pigeons are profligate breeders, and the passenger pigeon’s gene pool has probably been purged more than once.  Genetically speaking, passenger pigeons are a good candidate for de-extinction and one day flocks may again grace the skies of North America!

*********************************************************************************

Reference: Scientific American.

Image: Passenger Pigeons by John James Audubon

Copyright 2014 by Ann Marcaida.

Source: annmarcaida via
Source: peteneems via

nitanahkohe:

Hunger among Inuit families is so prevalent in the Arctic that it could be why almost half their children are shorter than average, new research suggests. A paper published in the Journal of the Canadian Public Health Association says the height discrepancy implies that food insecurity is a long-running problem — not just something that happens occasionally. ”The observed association between food insecurity and linear growth suggests that the diet quality and quantity of children from food-insecure households had been compromised for a long time,” the paper says.

…A McGill University study found in 2010 that 41 per cent of Nunavut children between three and five lived in homes where they either had no food for an entire day or where their parents couldn’t afford to feed them at least part of the time. Two-thirds of the parents said there were times when they ran out of food and couldn’t afford to buy more. In a 2012 study, Statistics Canada found that 22 per cent of Inuit reported going hungry during the previous year because they couldn’t afford food. Nunavut’s territorial nutritionist has found nearly three-quarters of Inuit preschoolers live in food-insecure homes. Half of youths 11 to 15 years old sometimes go to bed hungry.

"Food-insecure children were significantly shorter in stature, by an average of two centimetres, than their food-secure counterparts," the report says. "For children of this age group, this is close to half a year’s growth." They also found children from hungry families tended to be more anemic. ”The results of this study raise concerns about the long-term implications of food insecurity for Nunavik,” the report concludes.

Source: nitanahkohe via

unclothedqueer:

rly cool thing to do: train yourself to have they/them be your reflexive go-to pronoun 

Source: unclothedqueer via

lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’

Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014

Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly

Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz

Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis

Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba

Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi

Photograph #10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Source: lastuli via

johndarnielle:

silversprocket:

Cathy G Johnson has been nominated for this year’s Ignatz Award in “Promising New Talent” for damn good reason. Visit her and vote next month at SPX 2014. Here’s her seriously good (and unfortunately timely) comic from As You Were #3. Visit this Tumblr next week for our interview with Cathy and more arts!

As You Were is a punk-comix anthology series featuring new stories by our favorite independent artists from punk communities around the world. The theme for issue #3 is “Big, Big Changes”, available for [purchase here from Silver Sprocket].

As You Were is a great read and I recommend it!

Source: silversprocket via
micdotcom:

Austin’s new bathroom proposal is an innovation all cities should enact 

Once thought of as politically correct oddities, colleges, businesses and politicians alike are finally realizing the myriad benefits of gender-neutral restrooms.
The Austin City Council in Texas on Thursday joined the push for bathroom neutrality, introducing a resolution requiring single-stall public restrooms to be gender-neutral. If passed, Austin will be protecting the safety of transgender, gender queer and gender non-conforming individuals when using public restrooms. Austin would also be the first city in Texas to implement such a law.
But they’re not the first US city to do it | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

Austin’s new bathroom proposal is an innovation all cities should enact 

Once thought of as politically correct oddities, colleges, businesses and politicians alike are finally realizing the myriad benefits of gender-neutral restrooms.

The Austin City Council in Texas on Thursday joined the push for bathroom neutrality, introducing a resolution requiring single-stall public restrooms to be gender-neutral. If passed, Austin will be protecting the safety of transgender, gender queer and gender non-conforming individuals when using public restrooms. Austin would also be the first city in Texas to implement such a law.

But they’re not the first US city to do it | Follow micdotcom

Source: micdotcom via
theme credit